Aug 16 2016

Acidulous Hop Trip – Tart IPA with Devils Backbone

Months ago, I had mentioned my plan to homebrew a tart IPA to Jason Oliver, the brewmaster at Devils Backbone Brewing. I had heard about a few commercial breweries making this kind of beer and the challenge of making hoppy and sour work together was really interesting to me. To Jason’s credit, he was interested/foolhardy enough to suggest that I come out to his pilot brewery and make it there.

The game plan I had for the homebrew version was to sour an unhopped wort in a carboy for a few days to lactobacillus, and then to boil the wort for a few minutes to pasteurize the lacto. Then crash down the beer to do big, citrus hopstands and dry hopping in order to keep the bitterness very low to ensure that it doesn’t clash the sourness. There would need to be adjustments for the DBB system, but the process would essentially be the same.

My standard malt bill for IPAs is a mix of Maris Otter and American 2-Row with some wheat or oats thrown in for proteins and intangibles. For the most part, we stuck to the base malts with some acidulated malt to create a good pH environment for the kettle souring.

Malt Bill:

52% Maris Otter
38% Superior Pils (Canadian)
7% Acidulated Malt
3% Pale Crystal

Mashing In

The Mash

The batch would be 8.5 bbls and the goal original gravity was 15 Plato (1.060), which we hit. We mashed at 154F for 30 minutes, then raised the mash to 162F for 30 minutes, and then mashing out at 167F. We then brought the unhopped beer up to a 5 minute boil before crashing it down to 105F and pushing CO2 into the wort before the lacto pitch.

One of the biggest question marks for me was the size of the lacto starter for the beer. On the homebrew level, a 1000 or 2000ml starter is enough to sour 6 gallons of wort. But the right pitch for ~260 gallons was not a guess I was ready to make without doing my homework. Since I was using the Omega Yeast Labs Lactobacillus Blend (OYL-605), I made a quick call to them and they assured me that I could take my existing 2000ml starter and ramp it up to 3 gallons the day before and that would be sufficient.

3 Gallon Lacto Starter

3 Gallon Lacto Starter

When it came time to pitch the lacto starter, I let Jason do the honor. I feel pretty good about my ability to handle glass carboys, but if someone is going to invert a carboy into hot wort, I’m going to give that responsibility to the person who runs the brewery 99 out of 100 times.

Pitching Lacto

Pitching Lacto, Better Him Than Me

The wort was held at 105F for 2.5 days and the final pH was 3.3. It was then brought up to a 45 minute boil, and 3.5# of Citra, 3.5# of Comet and 1.75# Hallertau Blanc pellets were added to the whirlpool. The use of Comet was suggested by Jason and it seemed like a cool audible for the batch. Comet hops are not a new, but it sounds like one that had gone out of fashion in the 80s in favor of high alpha hops. It seems to be making a comeback now, and it is described as having a “wild American” aroma. (No, I still don’t know exactly what that means, but I think I might have to brew a clean, hoppy beer in the future featuring Comet to better understand it.)

 

Kettle and Hose

Kettle and, of course, the Hose

We fermented it with Chico yeast which dropped the beer down to a 1.013 final gravity, and a 6.4% ABV. It was finally dry-hopped with Citra, Comet and Nelson Sauvin for a few days before carbonating and packaging.

 

 

On The Menu

On The Menu

 

 

Acidulous Hop Trip

Acidulous Hop Trip

Tasting:
I’m really, really pleased with the final beer. There’s a profound sourness to it, but there’s no real bitterness for it to clash with, and the mix of hops kept it juicy and full of life. The hops were bright and citrusy with aromas and flavors of orange and lime peels. I feel like the Nelson Sauvin enhanced the perceived dryness of the beer, as well. I’ve been fortunate enough to work with a few local breweries over the years, and this beer is the most like my wild, experimental side. The most like what I do at home. For that reason alone, it is a success.

 

This might seem counter intuitive to some brewers, but I really don’t have a ton of experience with kettle souring beers. I’ve been brewing sours for about 8 years at this point and the majority of my sourings have come from co-pitching lacto with the yeast, or using pedio for long term souring. So the only thing that I’d change if I could would be to get a more complex sourness like I’m used to in my pedio beers, but that takes a very long time and, honestly, the current sourness makes it perfect for the heat that Virginia is currently experiencing.

 

Unfortunately, you might need to be in Virginia to try this one, but check out Acidulous Hop Trip if you see it around. It is currently on draft at the DBB Basecamp taproom and will be part of the Virginia Craft Brewers Fest this weekend (8/20/2016).

 

The Top Secret Batch:
For a twist on this one, I left the 3 gallon carboy I had used for the lacto starter and asked the guys to fill it with wort before the pitching the yeast. I brought that home and pitched the Yeast Bay Amalgamation Super Brett Blend upon it. I’ve dry hopped that batch, although I could not obtain Comet, and I plan to package that tonight. I’m interested to compare the two beers soon.

 

Thank you to Jason, Aaron and Erik for turning this crazy idea into a beer and playing loose with your brewing system for a few days. You guys rock.

 

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Aug 11 2016

Upcoming Collaborative Beer Releases with Some Local Breweries

I have a couple of beers that I’ve worked on with local breweries that are getting released in the coming weeks, and I wanted to give everyone a little heads-up. (My apologies in advance if this only applies to beer lovers around Virginia in neighboring states.)

Virginia Craft Brewers Fest 2016

Virginia Craft Brewers Fest – Acidulous Hop Trip with Devils Backbone Brewing (8/20/16)

The 5th Annual Virginia Craft Brewers Fest will happen on Saturday, August 20th, at the Devils Backbone Basecamp Brewpub. At last count, 85 Virginia breweries will be pouring their beers, and there will 3 bands and 9 food trucks to help you pace your day.

During the Fest, the Tart IPA that I made with Brewmaster Jason Oliver from Devils Backbone will debut under the Hoopla tent and at the outdoor bar. This beer is called Acidulous Hop Trip, and it brings together the disparate aspects of a hoppy IPAs and a sour ales. We kettle soured the unhopped beer with the Omega Yeast Lactobacillus Blend(OYL-605) and let that drop to a 3.3 pH over several days. The beer was then brought up to a short boil to kill the lacto, and then it was heavily whirlpool hopped with Citra, Comet and Hallertau Blanc. After fermenting with Chico, it got a heavy dry hop dose of Citra, Comet and Nelson Sauvin hops. The result is a tart, juice bomb that I’m looking forward to trying next weekend.

As an added experiment, I brought home 3 gallons of the unfermented wort and pitched some Yeast Bay Amalgamation Brett Super Blend on that for comparison.

I will do a full write-up for this blog once I’ve sampled the DBB version and my own brett version. I am working to get the Acidulous Hop Trip at a few local watering holes, as well, like Beer Run, and Kardinal Hall.

Hoopla

Hoopla Music and Beer Festival – Oud Bruin with Three Notch’d Brewing (10/1/16)

On the weekend of September 29th to October 2nd, the Hoopla Festival will happen at Devils Backbone Basecamp Brewpub. It is big event where you can camp, see great bands like the Old 97s and the Revivalists, and there’s lots of activities for the kids, too.

On that Saturday, October 1st, there will be a Rare Beer Festival from 12-3pm, and the Oud Bruin/Flanders Brown that I helped Three Notch’d Brewing with will be there to be enjoyed. This one hasn’t been formally named yet, but act surprised if somehow incorporates a bear, or a bear constellation, into its name. This beer has been aged for over a year in a wine barrel and then mixed fermented with a Scottish ale yeast, the ECY Dirty Dozen Brett strains and Yeast Bay’s Mélange.

What I’ve tasted, flat and straight from the barrel, was very malty, silky smooth and with a subdued sourness that defines the style. I happily took a backseat to 3N’s Levi in the creation of this one, and I was happy to help give a little advice and curate the bugs that went into this sour. I’m excited to taste the beer once it is carbonated and ready to share. More details are to come with this beer, as well, and I’m sure it will appear at the Three Notch’d Taproom in Charlottesville, too. 

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